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Sally Phillips & Shaun Dooley to star in new short Blood Shed!

rsz_blood_shed_castSALLY PHILLIPS and SHAUN DOOLEY to star in new short BLOOD SHED, directed by James Moran (writer of Severance, Cockneys vs Zombies, Doctor Who, Torchwood and Spooks)! Crowdfunding until 27th March!

rsz_shaun_dooley_to_play_jack_in_blood_shedThe award-winning SHAUN DOOLEY to play the role of Jack!

Shaun Dooley stars in the upcoming BBC One drama Gunpowder alongside Kit Harington and Liv Tyler, just the latest in a hugely impressive list of credits including a Royal Television Society North Award for Best Actor for Mark of Cain. From the heartbreak of Broadchurch and the Red Riding trilogy, to the hit movies The Woman in Black, The Awakening and Eden Lake, Shaun can always be relied upon to deliver a powerhouse performance. He showed a sensitive yet terrifying side in Misfits, as well as a barnstorming singing voice, proving his range, flexibility and fiercely unpredictable edge. He’s also appeared in the TV shows DCI Banks, Ordinary Lies, Cuffs, Great Expectations, The Game, This is England ’90 and Exile. Whenever Shaun appears on screen, you never know what might happen next, but you can guarantee it’ll always be exciting, even when there’s a shed involved…

Shaun said of Blood Shed, “As soon as I read the title it appealed to me. I grew up on horror and schlock movies and to be honest the thought of being covered in blood and entrails from a vomiting murderous shed?  Well, who in their right mind would say no?”

SALLY PHILLIPS rsz_sally_phillips_to_play_helen__-_phototo play the role of Helen!

Sally is a comedy ICON and writer instantly recognisable as one of the forces behind Channel 4’s award-winning comedy sketch show, Smack The Pony. She has also starred in the three smash hit Bridget Jones films and The Decoy Bride, which she co-wrote, and HBO’s Veep with Julia Louis-Dreyfus!

Sally has been a near-constant presence on British television, from I’m Alan Partridge, to Hippies, Green Wing, Miranda, and Parents. Sally co-starred in the 2016 film Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, as Mrs Bennet. Since 2004, she has played the title role in the BBC Radio 4 comedy show, Clare in the Community.

Blood Shed Synopsis:
Jack loves a bargain. And he loves sheds. When he buys suspiciously cheap second-hand parts online to build his very own dream shed, he and long-suffering wife Helen find they’ve got more than they bargained for: a killer shed with an appetite for blood. As the body count rises, and the shed’s ferocious appetite grows, Jack is faced with a horrifying dilemma. A comedy horror about a man’s twisted love for his shed… that eats people.

Crowdfunding campaign notes:
The team need to raise £10K to make this beautiful nightmare a reality, with a Kickstarter campaign live from 27th February – 27th March 2017. Currently 51% funded in just over a week, but full target must be met for the film to be made. Kickstarter link – https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jamesmoran/blood-shed-comedy-horror-short-about-a-man-eating/description

rsz_blood_shed_flyer_front_artTeam Biographies:
James Moran, co-writer and director, will already be familiar to many fans of the horror and comedy genre through his writing on the movies Severance, Cockneys vs Zombies and Tower Block, and internationally acclaimed TV shows such as Doctor Who, Torchwood, Primeval and Spooks. His other work includes 5-time Streamy Award nominated web series Girl Number 9, and several short films which he wrote and directed, including the award-winning hit Crazy for You (Best Horror/Sci-Fi, Crystal Palace International Film Festival), starring Arthur Darvill and Hannah Tointon, which screened at huge festivals across the globe and is now part of an anthology feature film.

Moran says, “I’ve always loved 80s horror, and I’m really excited to unleash our evil beast. For years, we’ve seen people getting killed in or near cabins and outhouses, but we’ve never seen a shed itself actually doing the killing – until now Cat Davies, co-writer and producer of the film, has worked professionally in production since 2005 at the BBC, ITV and as a publishing executive at BBC Worldwide managing the release of some of the UK’s biggest comedy titles. Cat is an expert in making the most of every penny and managing productions end-to-end. Cat is also an award-winning filmmaker, with her last short Connie starring Catrin Stewart, playing the international festival circuit and currently nominated for a prestigious iHorror award in the US. Cat is co-founder of Moranic Productions, with James.

Davies says, “We really need your help to make this happen and shoot the film in late April. We cannot wait to share Blood Shed with the world.”
Ben Foster (Torchwood, Thunderbirds Are Go, Happy Valley, Our Girl, Scott & Bailey, Banana), a BAFTA-nominated composer, is on score duties and firing up the synths NOW!

Crowdfunding Dates: 27th February – 27th March 2017 on Kickstarter
Official Website and Links:
www.bloodshedfilm.com
@bloodshedfilm
#bloodshedfilm #nightofthelivingshed

Devil In The Dark (2017) Review

rsz_ditd1Devil In The Dark (2017)

Running time: 82 minutes
Director: Tim Brown
Cast: Dan Payne, Robin Dunne, Briana Buckmaster, Daniel Cudmore

Available on VOD nationwide in the U.S. from Momentum Pictures on Tuesday, March 7th

Devil in the Dark is the second directorial offering from Tim Brown. It is a film teetering somewhere in between thriller and horror and interestingly, was originally entitled (the more thriller sounding) “The Plateau’.

Opening with a short but atmospheric prologue, the start of the film is pure horror. Night has fallen and a young boy is lost in the middle of the woods. His father and older brother frantically search for him, finally finding him in the midst of a clearing (in a striking red jacket reminiscent of ‘Don’t Look Now’). He is frozen to the spot and transfixed on something out in the darkness.

Cut forward thirty years and the film weaves down a more psychological thriller route. We meet the brothers again, they are now grown men and lead very different lives. Adam (the lost child in red) has moved away from home and lives a successful city life, whilst older both Clint has remained at home, settled down and cared for their now deceased father. The two are chalk and cheese, so when Adam returns to see his brother and take a hunting trip with him, it’s clear it’s not going to be an easy few days.

rsz_ditd2The awkward tension between the brothers is palpable from the outset and is further demonstrated by well placed flashbacks to their childhood. It becomes clear that Adam thinks their father favoured Clint and their relationship suffered accordingly. Before the men set off on their hunting trip, we also realise that Adam suffers from disturbing nightmares, reminiscent of the opening childhood scene. Whilst these visions are hauntingly presented, they are all too brief, leaving you wish they had been explored further.

It is only once the brothers set out on their trip that the true horror of the film finally sets in. As the pair struggle with their inner demons, they discover a bone infested lair inhabited by a dark being that threatens their lives. Their terror and the anticipation of the danger they face is well presented and you are drawn inside their fear. The vision of the demon itself is wisely kept to a minimum, but is strikingly created and impressive when it briefly does reveal itself.

There is no doubting the production value of Devil in the Dark, both the Director (Brown) and Writer (Carey Dickson) have a host of production credits behind them and it shows. The film looks slick and there are some magnificent shots that make the most of the great locations used for filming. The performances are also universally strong, with Dunne (as Adam) and Payne (as Clint) particularly scoring on the edgy sibling relationship front.

However, given all these positives, it still feels like there is something uneven about the film. The horror pay off doesn’t arrive until about three quarters of the way through and the wait seems far too long. Adam’s dreams aren’t enough to tide you over and the film hovers in this psychological drama territory, with no real fear or anticipation to tease you.

rsz_ditd3With the most entertaining and memorable moments happening in the latter stages, you’re left feeling that the end of the film would have made a great start to the third act. Frustratingly it felt like the film had hits its stride just as it was ending. Although it is an accomplished film with many good qualities, it never quite flies in the way that it should. When the horror hits, it is truly engaging, it just all feels rather too little, too late.

5 out of 10