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Bornless Ones (2016) Review

rsz_bo1BORNLESS ONES (2016)

Starring Margaret Judson, Devin Goodsell and Michael Johnston

Written & Directed by Alexander Babaev

With the help of her friends, Emily moves to a remote home to take better care of her brother, Zach, who is diagnosed with cerebral palsy. But what they don’t know is that the house kept a terrifying secret that will haunt them one by one“.

Horror movies that riff on The Evil Dead are nothing new. From Cabin Fever to Cabin in the Woods, and last years absolutely amazing Tonight She Comes, it really goes to show just how classic, timeless and inspiring Sam Raimi’s original demonic possession movie was. Hell, we’ve even got a hit TV spin-off over 30 years after its release!

It’s also a great springboard for low-budget genre loving filmmakers to cut their teeth. Isolated location, minimal cast, and plenty of opportunity for outlandish, ridiculous and crowd-pleasing violence.

Writer and director Alexander Babaev knows all this, but his Bornless Ones isn’t a lazy retread.

The script really sets Bornless Ones apart. Things start off seemingly quite sketchy, with cliched and juvenile humour and interactions coming from a young and attractive cast. But all of a sudden, without you really ever noticing, Babaev has established the relationships and backstory for each of the characters in a deft and effortless way. Then the demons are introduced, and these characters and their history’s are beautifully exploited. It’s nothing new, see Event Horizon, but it’s a refreshing change to see it all handled so expertly.

rsz_bo2Just as the story grows in confidence as the film goes on, so do the performances. Judson is an amiable and sympathetic heroine, her focus on her brother making her more than just a final girl. Goodsell grows into a fantastic asshole, becoming a human pin cushion as things get more horrific, and he communicates it with aplomb. Bobby T and Michael Johnston do well, again adding layers to what would usually be thin stock characters. The inclusion of Johnston as the cerebral palsy afflicted Zach adds a whole new dimension to the film.

Special mention must also go up David Banks as a nutso realtor who briefly shows up to add some real humour. But the standout was Mark Furze as Woodrow. So much more than the sex-obsessed character, Furze seems to add lots of little nuances to Woodrow as things go on. He’s a big talent.

Babaev doesn’t skimp on the gore either, with some excellent mostly practical FX that are very inventive and fun. It’s rare that this kind of film shows you something you haven’t seen before!

rsz_bo3On the downside, some of the editing felt a little off, the content cut to blacks giving an episodic feel to the flow, and the CGI used in some of the exterior shots felt unnecessary and could have been done practically.

But other than that, Bornless Ones is a really nice surprise. Tightly directed and well-written, with great performances and some outstanding violence, it’s well worth a watch for horror lovers.

8/10

OMG, I’m A Robot (2015) Review

rsz_omg_robot_posterOMG!? I’m a Robot (2015)

Directors: Tal Goldberg and Gal Zelezniak

Starring: Yotam Ishay, Tzahi Grad, Hili Yalon, Inna Bakelman

“Love the hand and fear the hand.”

Danny (Ishay) is hopelessly in love with Noa (Yalon). He is super nerdy, super sensitive, and after one post movie cry too many Noa puts the breaks on their relationship. He keeps calling her for eight months with no replies and decides to end it all. But, suicide is hard when you’re an indestructible robot. In a fit of confidence Danny takes his new-found mojo out on the town. But he STILL can’t forget Noa. He decides to swing by her apartment in the hopes of getting a face-to-face. All Danny gets is a cold shoulder from Noa’s roommate Maya (Bakelman). On his way home Danny is attacked by robot ninjas (yes you read that right). Luckily he can shoot lasers out of his hand.

Once he takes out the robot ninjas he realizes more is going on than he ever suspected. It turns out Noa has been kidnapped and it’s up to Danny to rescue her. The search for his maybe ex-girlfriend leads Danny to join forces with his boss at Gold Hi-tech Mr. Goldschmidt (Grad), a Jewish robot that looks like a garbage can named Robot Joseph (voiced by Rob Schneider), uncover a conspiracy, discover his true nature, and stop the launch of a weaponized satellite.

rsz_omg_robot_2OMG!? I’m a Robot is OMG so cute! There is incredibly little to criticize. This sci-fi, action comedy delivers sly humor, nerd references (literally every single t-shirt Danny wears) and fight sequences that look like a live-action manga or anime. The plot holds together well and deftly handles mystery, humor and action. The plot weaves together the disparate elements into a coherent whole and leaves no thread dangling. The directors obviously took great delight in the absurd situation and knew all the right nerd buttons to push. The characters are also well developed and sympathetic, even the villains and all the actors are more than capable which makes for easy emotional investment in the outcome.

The film also offers up some good commentary on masculinity. Danny, a typical 98 pound weakling in glasses is of course an unlikely hero. It’s obvious that Noa dumps him in the beginning because he’s too sensitive, too weak. But the film diverts from the usual zero to hero. Despite Goldschmidt’s attempts to toughen up Danny it only half works. Danny does toughen up, but instead of turning into a Terminator, he never loses his heart and compassion. In the end its heart that triumphs. Even Danny’s confrontation with the film’s villain is laced with empathy and tea drinking.

rsz_omg_robot_3If the film has any fault at all, it’s just that the directors deserved more money to throw at the special effects. Though the cheap CGI effects actually make the movie look and feel a bit like a Power Rangers episode, which might satisfy fans more. A must watch for sci-fi nerds.

Kudos for: The menorah gun

Lesson learned: If you’re a transformer, make sure it’s something useful like an electric kettle

8/10

FrightFest & FAB Press launch The FrightFest Guide To Monster Movies!

rsz_monster_book_-_front_cover_artworkFrightFest & FAB Press launch THE FRIGHTFEST GUIDE TO MONSTER MOVIES

FrightFest and FAB Press once again join forces to launch THE FRIGHTFEST GUIDE TO MONSTER MOVIES, which goes exclusively on sale during Horror Channel FrightFest 2017, Aug 24 – Aug 28. Following the success of The FrightFest Guide to Exploitation Movies, this is the second in a planned series of wide appeal books for both the curious spectator and the cult connoisseur,

Written by celebrated writer, editor & critic Michael Gingold, the book contains 200 of the most frightening, fantastical and fun monster film features. Starting in the silent era, it traces the history of the genre all the way through to the present day. The films are given detailed individual reviews, with fascinating facts and critical analysis.

There are the Universal Studios favourites such as Frankenstein’s Monster and the Mummy, the big bugs, atomic mutants and space invaders that terrorised the ’50s. Then there’s the kaiju of Japan, the full-colour fiends from Hammer and the ecological nightmares of the ’70s and ’80s, to the CG creatures and updated favourites of more recent years.

Cult-favourite filmmaker Frank Henenlotter, creator of some of the screen’s most idiosyncratic and bizarre beings, contributes a foreword, and it’s all illustrated with a ghoulish gallery of scary stills and petrifying posters representing the remarkable range of monstrous movies. Do you dare open the cover and confront the beasts within?

The official launch is at Horror Channel FrightFest, Cineworld, Leicester Square (24th to 28th August) The FrightFest exclusive hardcover will be on sale for just £20. The book’s international street date is 18 September 2017. Paperback price: £16.99 (UK) $24.95 (US)